Indystar Article - No Offers ??

SydCamore

The Captain Level
Kids get missed every year. There is a disconnect between colleges and high-school athletes. College coaches don't have the time, money, or resources to see EVERY kid. Therefore, the athlete and their family must take it upon themselves to contact colleges. That being said, every college can only take a specific amount of new athletes per year. Therefore, if an athlete does not contact enough college, they are going to be left on the outside looking in.

From this article, I see that they are somewhat blaming the IPS system. Well..... nowhere in a high-school coaches job description does it say, "responsible for helping student-athletes find colleges where they can play." High-school coaches do this as a favor to the athletes. However, high school coaches are also teachers and parents. When do they really have time to handle the recruiting of all of their athletes? So, usually student-athletes don't know what to do. This is basically the reason why you see people like Stephan Curry at Davidson, Scottie Pippen and Central Arkansas State, Terrell Owens at UT-Chattanooga, or Jerry Rice as Mississippi Valley State. KIDS GET MISSED.

There are basically two solutions...........
1.) Handle the recruiting yourself - This takes a lot of time and money. If a family (much like the one in this article) is not educated on recruiting, the student athlete could get missed and/or be ineligible. Often times, student-athletes and their families may set their goals to high. This particular athlete did not get offers from Big 10 schools. What about all the MAC, MVC, and OVC schools around here. Did those schools know about this athlete? Probably not.

2.) A student-athlete can hire a recruiting service to help in the recruiting process. The College Prospects of America is the most prestigous recruiting service in the world. They have some big name people that help them (Garth Brooks, the late Johnny Unitas, Robin Roberts, Fred Jacoby, Dom Capers, etc.). They contact hundreds of schools where student-athletes can compete and do everything possible to make sure that the student-athletes will be eligible to play in college. That being said, they only work with athletes that are good enough to play in college at the NCAA Division I, II, and III, NAIA, and Junior College levels. College Prospects of America exists to make sure that student-athletes go the "right" school. They also give athletes the best opportunity to receive athletic scholarships or financial aid packages. THEY EXIST SO THIS DOESN'T HAPPEN!

Recruiting is tough and unfortunately this happens.
 

bent20

The Odum Level
The only schools they mention are Indiana and Purdue, so maybe he had his expectations a little too high from the beginning and blew off smaller schools, or maybe the guy just isn't that good.
 

SydCamore

The Captain Level
The only schools they mention are Indiana and Purdue, so maybe he had his expectations a little too high from the beginning and blew off smaller schools, or maybe the guy just isn't that good.
Bent,

Good Point!

My guess is this.......... If IU/Purdue asked him to walk-on, don't you think he could play somewhere like Marian College or University of Indianapolis?

This happens all the time and it is sad.

Looking back over the last 5 or 6 years at ISU........ We were getting kids that believed they were better than ISU. However, ISU was the only school that offered them a scholarship. We ended up with kids on our team that would rather have been somewhere else and didn't want to come to ISU. It would be much more beneficial to the kid and to the college if the kid accepted his ability level.

Coach Miles has been recruiting kids that want to be here. Kids that know that ISU is the right level for them. I would rather have happy DI-AA level talent than ticked off DI-A level talent.
 

TJames

The JSW Level
You guys are so right.

From my years working at Indiana State, I can't tell you the number of players and parents who thought that they were too good to be at ISU. They certainly didn't last too long.

Part of the problem too is that some parents, as well as some high school coaches, think that a school like ISU or any of the other MVC schools are below them. They look down their noses at I-AA schools or lower.

"My Johnny is a Big Ten caliber player," seems to be the attitude. I know some high school coaches tend to want to direct kids to a major conference school because it looks good for their high school program. They care more about it in terms of their own ego than what's good for the kids.

I thought Trent Miles did a classy thing last night when he pointed out the local high school coaches and thanked them for their support of the ISU program.
 

new sycamore fan

The All-MVC Level
Maybe he didn't register with the Clearinghouse--many kids and schools have trouble with that every year, and colleges can't really do anything about it.

As for the rather having happy DIAA talent vs DI talent, I'm not so sure--it obviously depends on the kid and what they make of it. My guy's still pissed about being "overlooked" but he's happy with his current situation, and playing with a chip on his shoulder. I'd rather have this--confident kids with DI or marginally DI talent that got overlooked for whatever reason, and play like they intend to prove to all of the DI coaches that they made a mistake, WITHOUT BECOMING A CHEMISTRY PROBLEM for the team that did give them the opportunity to play. This has something to do with the "advice" they receive and what they hear from parents, peers, and other people in their ears--if everyone keeps blowing smoke about "what could have been" rather than "make the most of the opportunity you've been given", it can lead a kid in the wrong direction.
 

SydCamore

The Captain Level
New Fan,

You nailed it!

I think that we have had TOO many that did indeed become A CHEMISTRY PROBLEM.

It does not appear as though we have that anymore. The guys LOVE each other and the coaches. That is key.
 

country123a

The Starter Level
New Fan,

You nailed it!

I think that we have had TOO many that did indeed become A CHEMISTRY PROBLEM.

It does not appear as though we have that anymore. The guys LOVE each other and the coaches. That is key.
Amen to that. That's why schoolsl like Boise State are so successful against the big boys.
Highly touted athletes don't necessarily translate into wins. Look at Notre Dame...
 

bent20

The Odum Level
Look at schools like USC and Ohio State. They go five all-Americans deep at every position. These kids gamble their chance to play on the possibility they'll make the pros (worked for Sanchez). At least at those schools it's true in most cases. However, your average Big 10 player (scholarship or not) is never going to sniff the pros. You'd be better off going to a smaller school and enjoy being the big fish in a smaller pond. You just can't do it with a huge ego. The "less talented" kids, who are working their butts off, will make you look like a fool.
 

ISUCC

The Odum Level
Moderator
excellent post New, I hope this kid has the attitude you describe in your post, he sounds like he could be a good player, and he's going to walk on at ISU

From the Indy Star:
http://www.indystar.com/article/20090205/LOCAL0402/902050382/1159/SPORTS0202

Elias goes walk-on route
"While Center Grove's Moore is disappointed that Swift didn't get more attention from college recruiters, he's incensed about what happened to linebacker Anthony Elias.

Elias, the 2007 All-South Player of the Year and a consensus all-state pick in '08, didn't receive any scholarship offers and plans to walk on at Indiana State.

"I'm devastated,'' Moore said.

The 5-foot-11-inch, 228-pound Elias started four seasons at Center Grove, but major-college programs see his height as a drawback.

Moore wonders why he received no scholarship offers."

Maybe he didn't register with the Clearinghouse--many kids and schools have trouble with that every year, and colleges can't really do anything about it.

As for the rather having happy DIAA talent vs DI talent, I'm not so sure--it obviously depends on the kid and what they make of it. My guy's still pissed about being "overlooked" but he's happy with his current situation, and playing with a chip on his shoulder. I'd rather have this--confident kids with DI or marginally DI talent that got overlooked for whatever reason, and play like they intend to prove to all of the DI coaches that they made a mistake, WITHOUT BECOMING A CHEMISTRY PROBLEM for the team that did give them the opportunity to play. This has something to do with the "advice" they receive and what they hear from parents, peers, and other people in their ears--if everyone keeps blowing smoke about "what could have been" rather than "make the most of the opportunity you've been given", it can lead a kid in the wrong direction.
 

SydCamore

The Captain Level
I do not believe that New Sycamore Fan was talking about Anthony Elias.

Anthony Elias is very very very good. I have seen him play about 8 times. He is a bit small. However, he will be a good I-AA player.

I think there were issues with an injury that prevented him from getting a scholarship. He will be on scholarship here soon, I will almost gaurantee it.
 

TLS49

The Sycamore Level
blah blah blah my son is amazing blah blah blah I've coached this kid for years he is that good blah blah blah

bullshit.

I've been through the recruiting process. I earned my looks in camps (went to one every single weekend the summer before my Senior year...every single weekend.) I saw any and all kinds of player both worshipped and ignored.

The people that got left behind by the D-1A's didn't try hard enough to get their son noticed if he really was "that good". The others? They were the victims of genuinely nice coaches not wanting to break a kids heart.

Simply put, unless you really are that much of a stud, you won't be picked up by D-1A. If you are good enough, the size/weight issue is NOT an issue.

Me? I was 6'7 207 pounds my senior year. I played well enough to get looks all over the place in D-1A. They all told me I was too skinny, that i couldn't gain enough weight to be productive in their system. BS. I was slow and had no breakaway speed.

My first camp was at the University of Louisville. I positioned myself right up against a young man who now plays for Tennessee. I outplayed this kid so badly, made him look so stupid on the field, that Greg Nord (Tight Ends coach/assistant head coach) had his arm around me and walking me to meet Petrino talking about how my size didn't matter and he was going to push for the other kid's scholarship to be given to me. Greg Nord was just a nice guy, Louisville never offered me. I was too slow and had no breakaway speed with pads on. At 207 pounds I moved great without pads, but with them I lost a step. Nobody told me that on the phones, they just said keep playing well son we love what we see.

Another case in point? At the university of Cincinnati right now, an All-American defensive tackle stands a (listed) 6'1. I played against Terrell Byrd. That man was all of 5'10 350 pounds in high school. But he had talent and therefore size did not matter.


1-AA is full of "coulda-shoulda-woulda" stories. Nobody, and I repeat nobody, is happy to be signing 1-AA on signing day because everyone who signs 1-AA was just good enough to have their chains jerked around by the 1-A guys.

Having a chip on your shoulder is not rare, it is what makes 1-AA just as good a talent pool as any FBS 1-A program/conference.

Its a yearly thing nowadays. The 1-AA kids whine and bitch and moan after signing day about how they are too good to play at that level. Their parents and high school coaches feed that fire. Tom is right, most show up in their first fall and end up quitting by the next.

If there ever comes a day where I am coaching high school football I will be perfectly honest with both a player and his parents. I will tell them exactly what level their son is playing at and what he can expect in scholarships. If he doesn't want to give 1-AA or D-2/3 his best effort than I won't waste the time calling coaches on his behalf.

Kids don't understand the value of a scholarship, they understand the value of a jersey/chance at playing in the NFL.
 

TJames

The JSW Level
tls....

way to be. good comments. you've seen it. i've seen it. unless you are there in practices, around the kids when they come in, people just dont understand.

i am tired of high school coaches who think more about what a kid going to i-a means to their respective programs than they do in what's best for the indivudual player. i know all high school kids want to play at florida, usc, ohio state, florida state, miami, oklahoma. but not that many kids are good enough. those that are, do. those that aren't end up at other i-a schools or they end up on the i-aa level.

as someone who covers the colts for a living, i see these guys when they get drafted or sign as undrafted free agents. give me guys like antoine bethea (howard university), dominic rhodes (midwestern state) and robert mathis (alabama a&m). they dont come in with a cocky ego. they just come in and play.

just like the high school kids who show up the first day of college practice thinking that they are all that and then find out they're just one of 65 kids on a scholarship, the same happens when guys show up for their first nfl practice.

that's my advice to the guys who recently signed to play at indiana state. leave your egos at the door. be prepared to play.
 

IndyTreeFan

The Nicks Level
Supporter
Thanks guys!

This has honestly become one of the most insightful threads I think I've seen on this board. Thanks to those of you with actual knowledge of what goes on in recruiting and on the teams. It's really fascinating to read...
 

SydCamore

The Captain Level
Recruiting is tricky.

I am heavily involved with the recruiting process. Kids do in fact get missed. But like TLS said, "studs" rarely get missed, although it does happen.

The kids that get left our more than anybody else are the DII and DIII players. Every year, kids don't go anywhere because they don't know of any DII or DIII schools where they can play. DIII does not give athletics scholarships, but they can find money for good athletes, TRUST ME!
 

TLS49

The Sycamore Level
way to be. good comments. you've seen it. i've seen it. unless you are there in practices, around the kids when they come in, people just dont understand.

i am tired of high school coaches who think more about what a kid going to i-a means to their respective programs than they do in what's best for the indivudual player. i know all high school kids want to play at florida, usc, ohio state, florida state, miami, oklahoma. but not that many kids are good enough. those that are, do. those that aren't end up at other i-a schools or they end up on the i-aa level.

as someone who covers the colts for a living, i see these guys when they get drafted or sign as undrafted free agents. give me guys like antoine bethea (howard university), dominic rhodes (midwestern state) and robert mathis (alabama a&m). they dont come in with a cocky ego. they just come in and play.

just like the high school kids who show up the first day of college practice thinking that they are all that and then find out they're just one of 65 kids on a scholarship, the same happens when guys show up for their first nfl practice.

that's my advice to the guys who recently signed to play at indiana state. leave your egos at the door. be prepared to play.
We had a guy on our team when I was a sophomore and Junior, biggest asshole ever. An absolute locker room poison. But he was one of the best players Ohio had seen in years.

He was recruited by the world. Everybody came in to visit him. But my head coach didn't lie to the college guys, told him exactly what kind of attitude this kid had.

He ended up going 1-AA, we all expected him to fail. But somewhere along the line he turned the embarrassment into a fire. I've spoken with him since he left...nicest kid on earth now, very respectful.

The good part of the story? He played quarterback, fullback, half back, and wide reciever for his school...Played both ways at the 1-AA level and averaged 50-70 tackles a year at the safety spot.

They are talking 2nd - 3rd round for him. And nobody deserves it more in my opinion.

I think a lot of the success of a 1-AA coach would be how they turn kids like that one into proud 1-AA players. I don't think I can emphasize the humiliation this kid felt after he signed after all of the talking he did.
 
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